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Awards

Graduate Student Departmental Awards

The Department of Anthropology offers a number of awards to graduate students in recognition of their outstanding accomplishments in our program. The departmental awards and prizes include the following: the Luther S. and Dorothy C. Cressman Prize Competition; the Malcolm McFee Memorial Endowment Award; the Pauline Wollenberg Juda Memorial Endowment Fund Award Competition; Health Education Award; and the Theodore Stern and Homer Barnett Fellowship. In addition, archaeology graduate students are eligible for the Cheryl L. Harper Fund Scholarship and biological anthropology PhD students are eligible for Thomas L. Johnston and Helene S. Johnston Scholarship funds (for more information on Thomas Johnston, click here). Each award carries a different prize, which may include support for conference participation, support for research, summer support, professional development funds, or opportunities to develop and teach your own course. Solicitations are made for each award via the departmental listserv at least two weeks before the application is due. See below for more information and speak with your advisor.

 

 

Luther S. and Dorothy C. Cressman Prize Competition

The Cressman Prize, named after the founder of the UO Department of Anthropology, is one of two annual competitions for best research paper by an anthropology graduate student. The competition takes place in the winter or spring term. Applications are evaluated by the Departmental Awards Committee. The winner of this prize typically presents his or her paper at a Department Colloquium during the following academic year.

Recent recipients

2016: James Daria, “The conviviality of the Fandango: alterity, relationality, and performative culture in southern Veracruz, Mexico.”

2015: Tobin Hansen, “Redefining Relatedness and Care: Deportees on the Northern Mexico Border.”

2014: Anna Sloan, “Spirituality and the Seamstress: Birds in Ipiutak and Western Thule Lifeways at Deering, Alaska.”

2013: Klaree Boose, “Sex differences in tool use acquisition in bonobos (Pan paniscus).” Paper accepted for publication in the American Journal of Primatology.

 

 

The Malcolm McFee Memorial Endowment Award

The McFee Award, named after a cultural anthropologist who taught in the Department from 1965 to 1982, is one of two annual competitions for best research paper by an anthropology graduate student. The competition takes place in the winter or spring term. Applications are evaluated by the Departmental Awards Committee. The winner of this prize typically presents his or her paper at a Departmental Colloquium during the following academic year.

Recent recipients

2016: Colin Brand, “Genetic inference of demography in the Iyema bonobo (Pan paniscus) community at the Lomako Forest Reserve, DRC.”

2015: Evan Simons, “Constructing cranial ontogenetic trajectories: a comparison of growth, development and chronological age proxies using a known-age sample of Macaca mulatta.”

2014: Mu-Lung Hsu, “Whose Permanent Home: Myanmar’s ‘Foreign’ Races, ‘Indigenous’ Races, and the Myth of Indigeneity.”

2013: Theresa Gildner, “Effect of sleep quality and duration on cognitive function among older adults from five middle income countries: Results from the Study on global AGEing and adult health”

2013: Noah Simons, “Genetic diversity of North American captive-born gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla)” The paper was recently published in Ecology and Evolution.

 

 

Pauline Wollenberg Juda Memorial Endowment Fund Award

The Department of Anthropology awards small travel and research grants through the Pauline Wollenberg Juda Memorial Endowment Fund. The awards assist undergraduate and graduate students in the anthropological study of nutrition. The competition takes place annually in the fall term. Applications are evaluated by the Departmental Awards Committee.

Recent graduate student recipients

2016

Diana Christie: Travel to present, “Within group variation in the gut microbiome of the Ugandan red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) from Kibale National Park, Uganda,” at the International Society of Primatologists Congress.

Hyunsoo Lee: Travel to present, “Comparative perspective across the Early Holocene Northeast China and Korea: Archaeobotanical study on Hougaomuga site, Jilin Province, “at the SouthEast Asian Association conference.

Jess Stone: Travel to present, “Isotopic Analysis of Prehistoric Human Diet at Chelechol ra Orrak, Palau,” at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists meetings.

 

Felicia Madimenos’ dissertation research was supported by a Juda Award.

 

Anthropological Health Education Department Fund Award

The Anthropological Health Education Department Fund Award supports anthropological studies of human health, including sociocultural, biological, and archaeological efforts. Both undergraduate and graduate student research and travel are supported through this award. The competition takes place annually in the fall term. Applications are evaluated by the Departmental Awards Committee.

Recent graduate student recipients:

2016

Noah Simons: Travel to present, “Regulation of Immune Gene Expression and Disease Susceptibility in the Endangered Ugandan Red Colobus, ” at the International Society of Primatologists Congress.

Elisabeth Goldman: Travel to present, “Evaluating minimally invasive methods of telomere length measurement: A sub-study of the WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE),” at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists meetings.

Josh Schrock: Research entitled, “Inflammation, low mood, and costly behavior among Shuar forager-horticulturalists.”

 

 

The Stern and Barnett (Graduate Teaching) Fellowships

Each year the Graduate Committee chooses Stern and Barnett Fellows at the same time it chooses regular graduate teaching fellows. Graduate students propose to teach a class and submit a letter of interest, letters of recommendation, CV, and syllabus for the proposed class. These fellowships offer a year-long GTF with a level of appointment (“FTE”) of .4 for the terms in which the student does not teach his or her own course and .49 for the term in which s/he does teach his or her own course. Generally, two students are selected each year.

Recent recipients

2015-2016: Melissa Liebert for a course in “Human Biological Variation.”

2014-2015: Gennie Nguyen for a course in “Race and Housing.”

2014-2015: Jamie Kennedy for a course in “Hunter Gatherer Archaeology.”

2013-2014: Tara Cepon for a course in “Parasites in Human Health and Evolution.”

 

 

Cheryl L. Harper Memorial Fund Scholarship

Cheryl L. Harper amid Pueblo ruins in Frijoles Canyon, New Mexico. Courtesy: Dave Meddish.

The purpose of the Fund is to honor Cheryl L. Harper, a 1994 alumna in Anthropology, who went on to graduate work in archaeology. The scholarship provides support to graduate students in archaeology in the Department of Anthropology. The scholarship may be used for educational expenses including tuition, fees, books, miscellaneous supplies, room, board, summer research stipend or insurance stipend, field research, technical analyses, collections research, travel, and other costs associated with research and/or dissertation. Any graduate student of archaeology is eligible to apply. Candidates will be evaluated based on financial need and the overall quality of their academic work. Selection of recipients shall be by a scholarship committee under the oversight of the Department Head.

Recent recipients

2015-2016: Damion Sailors, To support research entitled, “An Archaeological Study of Pacific Island Aquaculture.”

2014-2015: Annie Caruso, To support research entitled, “A Critical Heritage Analysis of the Carriacou Archaeology Field Project.”

2012-2013: Anna Sloan, To support research entitled, “Alaska Native Cultures and Languages: Coursework for Summer 2013.”

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Tara Cepon: The role of social/economic change in parasite exposure and the development of autoimmune disorders among the Shuar forager-horticulturalists of Amazonia: An evolutionary medicine approach ($500)

Alese Colehour: The Ecology of Childbirth ($500)

Theresa Gildner: The Effects of Sex, Testosterone Level, and Market Integration on Intestinal Parasite Load in an Indigenous Ecuadorian Population ($500)

Noah Simons: Immunogenetics of Ugandan Red Colobus in Response to Retroviruses ($1000)

Melissa Liebert: The Shuar Health and Life History Project: The psychosocial stress response of children
from varying degrees of market integration in an indigenous lowland Ecuadorian population ($500)

Andrea Eller: Pace of dental eruption and epiphyseal fusion in captive Macaca mulatta ($500)